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VyOS PLATFORM BLOG

Building an open source network OS for the people, together.

 

Firewall groups today and tomorrow

Substantial work has been done by Marian Tudosoiu to bring IPv6 firewall groups to the current implementation of firewall configuration scripts even before we give it a complete rewrite. It's already merged into the current branch and is expected to be included in the 1.2.0-rc1 release. Now it's probably a good time to make a post about using firewall groups for those who haven't used them yet.

Of course there's still a lot of work to be done, such as integrating groups into NAT, which likely does require a complete rewrite to be feasible.


The concept is simple enough: instead of creating multiple rules that only differ in one address or port number, you create a group with all those addresses and ports, and reference it in a rule.

VyOS has three group types: address groups, network groups, and port groups. In 1.1.8 they can only be used with IPv4 firewall rulesets, including "policy route" rules.

Let's create some groups:

set firewall group port-group ManagementPorts port 22
set firewall group port-group ManagementPorts port 23
set firewall group port-group ManagementPorts port 443

set firewall group address-group Servers address 10.10.0.10
set firewall group address-group Servers address 10.10.0.15
set firewall group address-group Servers address 10.10.0.20

set firewall group network-group TrustedNets network 192.168.5.0/24
set firewall group network-group TrustedNets network 172.18.19.128/25
set firewall group network-group TrustedNets network 10.20.30.144/32

Now we can create a ruleset that uses them. Let's make a rule that references nothing but groups:

set firewall name DMZ-In rule 10 action accept
set firewall name DMZ-In rule 10 protocol tcp
set firewall name DMZ-In rule 10 source group network-group TrustedNets
set firewall name DMZ-In rule 10 destination group port-group ManagementPorts
set firewall name DMZ-In rule 10 destination group address-group Servers

An important part is that you can modify groups on the fly without updating any rules.

As you can see, groups is a simple concept that can be learnt in minutes. Once they are in IPv6 and NAT, their use will be very similar.

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